African History: The Kingdom of kush (Kushite We All Say) 

The kushite’s pyramids

Located in the desert sands near the Nile in modern Sudan, the ancient culture of Nubia played a an important role in shaping Egypt from the eighth century B.C., serving as that kingdom’s 25th dynasty in the Late Period. 

Blessed  with tall, slender pyramids, the wealthy Nile city of Meroë was the seat of power of Kush, and ancient kingdom and rival to Egypt.

Who Were the Kush?

The Kush were a civilization that developed to the south of the Egyptians, but also on the Nile River. After the Nubian pharaohs lost power, they retreated south from Egypt to form the Kingdom of Kush, which thrived in splendid isolation as the rest of Egypt suffered through repeated invasions from Assyrians, Persians, and Greeks. Originally, the Egyptians established trading outposts in this region, which attracted many of the locals in search for a better life. However, instability back in Egypt meant that many of the Egyptians went home. Left behind were a large number of people known as the Kush, who had a great deal of admiration for the culture of Egypt

Location of kush

Because of Meroë’s distance, the Kushites were able to retain their independence, developing their own vibrant hybrid of Egyptian culture and religion until well into the fourth century A.D. With access to mines and minerals, the Meroites were expert goldworkers. They built temples, palaces, and royal baths in their capital. Perhaps their grandest achievements are the more than 200 pyramids built at the necropolis at Meroë, giving Sudan more pyramids than all of Egypt. Tall, slender, graceful: These monuments bear witness to the lasting splendor that was Kush.

Kushite culture blended Egyptian customs into its own, creating a distinctive, visual style, because of Meroë’s distance, the Kushites were able to retain their independence, developing their own vibrant hybrid of Egyptian culture and religion until well into the fourth century A.D. With access to mines and minerals, the Meroites were expert goldworkers. They built temples, palaces, and royal baths in their capital. Perhaps their grandest achievements are the more than 200 pyramids built at the necropolis at Meroë, giving Sudan more pyramids than all of Egypt. Tall, slender, graceful: These monuments bear witness to the lasting splendor that was Kush.

While they may not get all the attention of other Egyptian neighbors, such as the Persians or Hittites, the Kush were a major factor in many of Egypt’s decisions, both regarding trade and warfare. 

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